Workshops

Transforming the Humanities. Mellon Funded Undergraduate Research Workshop: Monitoring Undergraduate Research Projects in the Humanities

September 17, 2019

12:00 – 2:00

MHRA 2711

Guest: Dr. Jenny Shanahan, Bridgewater State University

Participation in undergraduate research is less common in the humanities and other traditionally solo-scholar disciplines than in fields of study in which teams of researchers typically collaborate (e.g., natural and physical sciences) for several reasons. A fundamental explanation is the epistemological distinction between disciplines in which knowledge is discovered and validated collaboratively (often on laddered teams of faculty, postdocs, graduate students, and/or undergraduates) and those in which findings are more often the result of individual pondering and insight, quietly honing one’s craft of analysis and writing, and other unseen intellectual work. This workshop addresses the challenges of involving undergraduates in faculty scholarship in the humanities and seeks to build capacity for such work that emerges from humanities faculty scholarship,
thereby creating opportunities for more students to engage in undergraduate research without significantly adding to faculty workload. We will examine and discuss several successful models of mentoring undergraduate research in the humanities (e.g., collaborations with individual or small groups of undergraduates, the involvement of an entire class in a scholarly endeavor, initiating and maintaining an ongoing humanities “lab” or Digital Humanities project) and how the role of the faculty mentor functions differently in each of them.

 For Humanities and associated disciplines.

Jenny Olin Shanahan, Ph.D., is Assistant Provost for High-Impact Practices at Bridgewater State University of Massachusetts, where she leads the Honors Program, Undergraduate Research, and National Fellowships and brings a cross-divisional, strategic focus to other high-impact practices, including Internships, Service Learning, and Global Engagement. In her previous position as Director of Undergraduate Research, Dr. Shanahan oversaw a five-fold increase in student participation in faculty-mentored scholarly projects across Bridgewater State. Her research and leadership efforts are dedicated to inclusive, equitable access to excellent opportunities for all students. Dr. Shanahan recently served as an Executive Board member of the Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) and has been a CUR Councilor since 2008. She holds a Ph.D. in Literature from Marquette University and was Associate Professor of English and Director of the Honors Program at St. Mary’s University of Minnesota before moving to Bridgewater State in 2010.

https://workshops.uncg.edu/Workshop-Schedule/2149

Transforming the Humanities. Mellon Funded Undergraduate Research Workshop: Course-based Undergraduate Research Experiences in the Humanities

September 18, 2019

12:30 – 2:30

MHRA 2711

Guest: Dr. Jenny Shanahan, Bridgewater State University

Undergraduate research opportunities in the humanities are typically available to a very small number of students, and those undergraduates who are offered the chance to work with a faculty mentor are disproportionately from socio-economically advantaged backgrounds and have high GPAs. Mentored scholarly work is often inaccessible to the very students who could benefit most from the experience. The surest means of addressing that equity gap is embedding meaningful scholarly work in
course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs), which engage every student in a course in undergraduate research. Assessment of CUREs in the sciences indicates that students learn critical research skills, report excitement about the inquiry process, and demonstrate greater independence and confidence in taking on challenging assignments. CUREs in the humanities can be similarly designed to support students’ gains in scholarly skills, more positive attitudes toward research and writing, and increasing self-reliance in academic work. This session provides models and guidelines for designing CUREs at various levels of humanities curricula.

For Humanities and associated disciplines.

Jenny Olin Shanahan, Ph.D., is Assistant Provost for High-Impact Practices at Bridgewater State University of Massachusetts, where she leads the Honors Program, Undergraduate Research, and National Fellowships and brings a cross-divisional, strategic focus to other high-impact practices, including Internships, Service Learning, and Global Engagement. In her previous position as Director of Undergraduate Research, Dr. Shanahan oversaw a five-fold increase in student participation in faculty-mentored scholarly projects across Bridgewater State. Her research and leadership efforts are dedicated to inclusive, equitable access to excellent opportunities for all students. Dr. Shanahan recently served as an Executive Board member of the Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) and has been a CUR Councilor since 2008. She holds a Ph.D. in Literature from Marquette University and was Associate Professor of English and Director of the Honors Program at St. Mary’s University of Minnesota before moving to Bridgewater State in 2010.

https://workshops.uncg.edu/Workshop-Schedule/2150

Transforming the Humanities. Mellon Funded Undergraduate Research Workshop: Humanities Based Community Engaged Research

October 3, 2019

1:00 – 3:00

Faculty Center

Guest: Dr. Teresa Mangum, University of Iowa

In this hands-on workshop, we invite participants to bring an assignment or a syllabus that you would like to revise to include an experiential, public-facing assignment. While some participants may hope to develop a course fully embedded in community-based learning, others may be seeking ways to turn a writing assignment into a more open form of public writing. The workshop will take participants through a series of short exercises to clarify learning objectives, consider what engaged strategies are most appropriate for the objectives, and possible partnerships—whatever the extent of the revision or the experience level of the participant. Everyone should leave the workshop with a clear action plan of next steps to engaged practice.  For Humanities and associated disciplines.

 Teresa Mangum is a professor in the departments of Gender, Women’s, and Sexuality Studies and English and director of the Obermann Center for Advanced Studies at the University of Iowa. Mangum’s research interests include best practices in publicly engaged scholarship and collaboration, 19th-century British literature, cultural negotiations with aging and between humans and other species. She edited A Cultural History of Women: Volume 5: The Age of Empire, 1800-1920 and authored Married, Middlebrow, and Militant: Sarah Grand and the New Woman Novel. She has just completed co-directing a Mellon-funded initiative with Grinnell College, “Digital Bridges for Humanistic Inquiry,” and launched a new Mellon project to design an interdisciplinary, experiential, and applied PhD, “Humanities for the Public Good.” She co-edits a book series “Humanities and Public Life” for the University of Iowa Press. Mangum is a founding member of the Academy of Community Engagement Scholarship and Vice President of the Board of Directors for the National Humanities Alliance. 

Recommended advance reading for the workshop:

Gregory Jay. “The Engaged Humanities: Principles and Practices for Public Scholarship and Teaching.” Journal of Community Engagement and Scholarship 3.1 (2012).

http://imaginingamerica.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/jay-publichumanities.pdf

Teresa Mangum. “Going Public—Humanities for the Twenty-first Century.” Pedagogy 12.1 (2012): 5-18.

https://read.dukeupress.edu/pedagogy/article-abstract/12/1/5/20298/Going-PublicFrom-the-Perspective-of-the-Classroom?redirectedFrom=fulltext

Vanderbilt University Center for Teaching website: “What Is Service Learning or Community Engagement”
https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/teaching-through-community-engagement/

http:// https://profession.mla.org/pride-and-presentism-on-the-necessity-of-the-public-humanities-for-literary-historians/

https://workshops.uncg.edu/Workshop-Schedule/2151


Transforming the Humanities. Mellon Funded Undergraduate Research Workshop: Portfolio and Reflection in the Humanities

October 29, 2019

1:00 – 3:00

MHRA 2711

Guest: Dr. John Zubizarreta, Columbia College

The learning portfolio is a concept that is strongly suited to enhancing learning. It is both process and document, encouraging reflection, collaborative mentoring, and emphasis on documentation of learning through detailed outcomes. It is a powerful way of providing evidence of learning tied to students’ reflections on the content, scope, and value of their learning. While portfolios provide teachers with diverse, multi-source information about learning for the purposes of assessment and evaluation, the final recipient of the learning portfolio’s benefits is the student, an appropriate and worthwhile achievement in higher education. For Humanities and associated disciplines.

RSVP: http://bit.ly/2NaGZtc

Transforming the Humanities. Mellon Funded Undergraduate Research Workshop: Humanities Lab: Higher Impact Learning in the Humanities

November 12, 2019

12:30 – 2:30

MHRA 2711

Guest: Dr. Kerill O’Neill, Colby College

These innovative courses promote experiential learning in the arts and humanities. They include hands-on observation, experimentation, and skill-building perspectives more commonly associated with the natural sciences. Courses across the humanistic disciplines can turn the local museums, special collections in libraries, or off-campus locations across the city into laboratories. Labs add new dimensions to the intrinsic value in studying the humanities. For Humanities and associated disciplines.

RSVP: http://bit.ly/35XUncW

Transforming the Humanities. Mellon Funded Undergraduate Research Workshop: Transparent Design of Course-based Undergraduate Research Experiences (CUREs)

January 29, 2020

1:30 – 3:30

MHRA 2711

Guest: Dr. Mary Ann Winkelmes, Brandeis University

Data from an AAC&U study of students’ learning at seven Minority-Serving Institutions identifies transparent instruction (involving faculty/student discussion about the relevant knowledge, skills to be practiced, required tasks, expected criteria and examples before students begin working) as a replicable teaching intervention that significantly enhances students’ success, with greater gains for historically underserved students. In this workshop we’ll review the findings as well as educational research behind the concept of transparent teaching/learning. Then we’ll apply that research to the design of your own Course-based Undergraduate Research Experiences. Participants will leave with a draft assignment or activity for one of their courses, and a concise set of strategies for designing transparent assignments and class activities that promote students’ learning equitably.  For Humanities and associated disciplines.

RSVP: https://workshops.uncg.edu/event/transforming-the-humanities-mellon-funded-undergraduate-research-workshop-transparent-design-of-course-based-undergraduate-research-experiences-cures/

Transforming the Humanities. Mellon Funded Undergraduate Research Workshop: EPortfolios in the Humanities Transforming the Humanities.

February 26th, 2020

12:30-2:30

MHRA 2711

Guest: Professor Bret Eynon, CUNY.

Pedagogy of the ePortfolio Classroom:

Reflection, Integration, and Purposeful Self-Authorship

In High-Impact ePortfolio Practice: A Catalyst for Student, Faculty, and Institutional Learning (2016), Eynon and Gambino presented the Catalyst Framework for ePortfolio learning and demonstrate the ways that ePortfolio practice, “done well,” improved student success, building engagement and higher order thinking capacities.  Drawing on research from 24 campuses, this synthesis led to ePortfolio’s recognition as the 11th validated High Impact Practice.  Eynon and Gambino’s edited collection, Catalyst in Action (2018), presented 20 case studies of high-impact ePortfolio practice, ranging from Yale University to Arizona State, from the University of South Carolina to LaGuardia Community College.  Historian Bret Eynon will draw on this research to discuss the key elements of effective ePortfolio pedagogy.  Together we’ll explore examples of ePortfolio pedagogy in action and consider potential applications to our own classrooms.

In this workshop, Professor Bret Eynon will help us explore the benefits of ePortfolios and how they can more fully engage students and faculty in learning and documenting learning outcomes.

RSVP: https://bit.ly/3ab2e92